This is a cry frequently heard as deadlines approach 😉 .
You can hear most of the managers screaming about this issue….
However there could be a number of answers:

1. The testers were not able to complete testing due to a new release being loaded.
2. The bug was not in an earlier release (reload that earlier release and see).
3. The bug could not be tested for earlier because some part of the release did not work and inhibited
the test’s ability to “see” the bug.
4. The bug was in some part of the system not originally planned for the release for which a test has
only just been written.
5. The bug was found while running some other test.
6. The bug was in a part of a system which was not the focus of testing.
7. The bug would have been found eventually, but the tester hadn’t run the test (which would have
found it) yet.
8. And yes, maybe if we’d been more thorough we’d have found that bug earlier.

Its always good to keep in place a corrective action in place so that the impact of the issue can be minimized and the stake holders and the client/s do not lose faith on you and your team.

Here is an artcle by Aashu Chandra my manager at Infogain (my previous company) about What to do if a bug has leaked into production?

Enjoy and let me know your thoughts on this.

Regards,

Himanshu

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