Category: India


Got this in an e-mail today..read on and njoy……

Calling the boss H – Hitler, A – Arrogant, R – Rascal and I – Idiot caught everyone’s attention in Naukri’s TV commercial, would you do the same if given an opportunity? Even though it was just an advertisement, it did reflect the plight of employees in the IT industry. After receiving interesting comments on “10 reasons why people quit jobs in IT industry”, we decided to take it a step further to analyze what exactly is going wrong. We conducted a survey to find out top ten mistakes that even good managers and bosses make.

So I am listing below the top ten mistakes which are very common amongst bosses.

1 – Micro-management
Sometimes when bosses assign work to an employee they don’t completely trust that employee will be capable of completing the work. They underestimate the ability of the people they hire and end up offending the employee. “According to me, the number one mistake is, not effectively identifying the strengths of the employee, thereby micro managing or not delegating or not trusting the employee’s judgment. A good boss is one who brings out the best in the employee,” says Sharda Balaji, Founder of NovoJuris Services.

2 – Using improper mode of communication
Some bosses have this weird sense that since they are boss they should order people around and create a military kind of environment. They feel the stricter the things are the better things are organized. If an employee is late for some deadline, then the boss starts labeling the work or the employee himself.

3 – Leading through intimidation
This is one of the worst kind of mistake that bosses make. They feel that if an employee is threatened to work they will perform better. What the boss does not realize is that employee under such pressure end up losing interest in work and will meet the deadline just for the heck of it. Such employees then would only do what is asked from them and will never happily give hundred percent to do something good for the company.

4 – Lacking empathy for employee’s situation
There are sometimes when employees do make excuses to take leave or when they come late. But not every reason is an excuse. Bosses end up thinking that their employees are always making excuses and do not showing any consideration for employee’s situation

5 – Becoming inaccessible to your employees
An employee wants to contact his boss for something important but he is busy with other things and does not give any weightage to employee’s problem and hence he is scared to approach his bosss.

“I have had some experiences at one of the company I worked with, where the manager was just not approachable and accessible. I could not expect any kind of guidance from him. It would not be wrong if I say that he was too busy caught with meetings (not accessible). He was also not approachable at the same time because of bad temperament and everything depended on his mood,” said Prashant Honnavar, who is a Manager of HR at NextBiT Computing.

6 – Not providing guidance or motivating employees
An employee should always have something to look forward to. A good manager knows how to motivate employees to make them perform better but for this they have to spend some time with their team. In today’s IT work environment many of the managers have no time to spend with the team due to day long meetings. As a result they miss out on understanding a team member’s problem at work and providing the right support and solutions for the same. Failing to support and understanding a team member will lead to recipe of resignation. A manager should always have the practice of having one on one to know more about the team member, and then provide right feedback at the same time to motivate with the right attitude.

7 – Not providing a clear picture – Transparency
Many times work is assigned by bosses to employees without clearly telling them the complete picture. Boss should always maintain transparency with their employee to make them understand what exactly they are doing. “If bosses start informing their team about the correct scenarios and maintain transparency about a project, then the employees will work more willingly and meeting the deadline will no longer be a concern of the boss alone,” said Juilee Joshi, who worked as a Technical Support analyst at BMC software.

8 – Insecurity about their post
Some bosses prefer to do things alone rather than taking teams help as they are unsecure that someone will provide better solution, and thus they get a sense of insecurity about their post. “There is something unique about Indian bosses. They get this superiority complex about their position and I fail to understand why. There are many extremely capable folks who like to remain in the ‘individual contributors’ role because they do not enjoy people management,” said Balaji. “You can deal with an egoistic boss, a demanding boss, an impatient boss… but the worst kind is the one who is insecure.”

9 – Trying to be friend as well as boss or showing partiality
This is the trickiest part of the boss-employee relationship. Some of the bosses try to maintain a perfect balance between professionalism and friendship but it does not always work well for the company. Employees might become lenient in submitting at deadline or boss might start expecting too much from employees since they are good friend as well.

Another part of this equation can be showing partiality or favoring certain employees over others which create negative vibes in the team.

10 – Making fake promises
In order to motivate employees many time managers make fake promises of promotion or goodies but when the time comes they just stall it. This de-motivates an employee a great deal and might backfire badly on the company.

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Google has announced a new tool that makes public the government requests it receives for data and content removal. It’s called Government Requests, and it currently shows requests that Google received between July 1 and December 31, 2009.

FYI India has asked

  • 1061 data requests
  • 142 removal requests (see pic & link)

Google admits that these numbers are imperfect and may not provide a complete picture of these government requests in a very detailed FAQ.

Google says it will update the tool with new data in six-month increments, and that the company intends to “provide more detail about our compliance with user data requests in a useful way” in the future.

Here is the link

Absolutely stunning. The Sixth sense technology.
Guys – must watch!!

Absolutely stunning to see where technology is heading and what the future is gonna look like.

And be proud – the man behind this is an Indian!!

This is just incredible and unbelievable, yet true. Click the URL below and see the demo and find out how things are going to change in the computer world.

See the live demo of Pranav Mistry who shook the world recently on this Sixth Sense Technology.

This is simply a terrific presentation and absolutely astounding!! !!!!

At TED India, Pranav Mistry demos several tools that help the physical world interact with the world of data — including a deep look at his SixthSense device and a new, paradigm-shifting paper “laptop”.

In an onstage Q&A, Mistry says he’ll open-source the software behind Sixth Sense, to open its possibilities to all. MICROSOFT better watch out.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Pranav-Mistry-The-thrilling-potential-of-SixthSense-technology/videoshow_ted/5231080.cms

Here is an article by Santosh Desai that I would like to share with you.

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The demise of Bajaj scooter represents a passing of not only an era but a consciousness. Nothing captured the complex reality of existence in Middle India better than this hybrid creature that offered mobility and convenience albeit grudgingly.

If the Indian middle class man were to be reborn as a product, chances are it would be as the Bajaj scooter. Squat, a belly going to pot, wearing a grey safari suit, undistinguished but resourceful. With a wife perched uncomfortably at the back, Gudiya squeezed between the two and Cheeku standing up front. No product came close to capturing the essence of middle class India as well as the Bajaj scooter. For decades the scooter was both literally and metaphorically at the heart of the Indian middle class consciousness, imparting its own unique flavour to how we lived our lives.

The scooter carried with it an aura of safety (over its macho cousin the motorcycle) that its engineering does not quite merit. Its smaller wheel size actually made it a less stable vehicle than the motorcycle but the air of safety that it so convincingly carried had to more to do with images that surrounded it. It had a stepney, which provided a welcome safety net on independent-minded Indian roads. It had space to squeeze in a full family, a place to carry vegetables, a dickey to store sundry needs of the family- in short, it seemed safe because it catered to the all those stable, worldly things that made a man a “responsible” person. Most importantly, the scooter hid the machine from view. Unlike the bike which revels in displaying its muscular architecture, the scooter covered up the beast within with rotund blandness. The rounded soft shape of the scooter helped it be seen as a domesticated beast of burden, anonymously performing the duties asked of it. Overall, the scooter was middle class and safe because it went out of its way to advertise its lack of masculine ambition; it wore its unprepossessing modesty on its sleeve, by eschewing any heroics.

This was evident in the manner in which the scooter negotiated the road. If the bike saw the road as a woman to make love to, the scooter preferred instead to haggle with her. The bike hugs the curves of the road, melting the rider onto the tar; the scooter maintained an awkward distance, unconvinced that continuous mobility is a natural human condition. If the bike purrs, the scooter stammers; where the bike is a gushing river, the scooter a spluttering tap; if the bike an untamed stallion, the scooter a recalcitrant mule. The bike pillion rider fuses into the driver- dropping a girl home on a bike is a rake’s pleasure, on a scooter a – cousin brother on duty. If John Abraham is the poster boy for bikes, Amol Palekar on his way to the ration shop is the abiding scooter role model. Heroes on bikes wear bubble helmets and boots, on scooters they chew paan and give signals with their feet.

The scooter celebrates the functionality of motorised mobility, not its recreational energy. At a time when we coped with scarcity with heartbreaking dignity, the Bajaj scooter was our imperfect solution. It needed to be kicked incessantly, first aggressively and then pleadingly, at times it needed to be tilted at an impossible angle for the fuel to start flowing and its spark plugs needed more cleaning than Bihar politics, but it blended in perfectly with how we lived and what we believed in. Restrained, repressed, modest, versatile in an unassuming way, the scooter spoke for us and our way of life like nothing else. No wonder the Hamara Bajaj campaign rung so true- for once advertising made us look into a mirror and told us a truth we all recognised.

With the Bajaj scooter gone, we have lost a vital part of our connection with our sense of our own middleclass-ness. It is not just Hamara Bajaj that is gone, but a reference point to our idealized way of life that is no more.

Investment analyst and entrepreneur Dr. Marc Faber concluded his monthly bulletin (June 2008) with the Following:

”The federal government is sending each of us a $600 rebate. If we spend that money at Wal-Mart, the money goes to China. If we spend it on gasoline it goes to the Arabs. If we buy a computer it will go to India. If we purchase fruit and vegetables it will go to Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala.

If we purchase a good car it will go to Germany. If we purchase useless crap it will go to Taiwan and none of it will help the American economy.

The only way to keep that money here at home is to spend it on prostitutes and beer, since these are the only products still produced in US. I’ve been doing my part.’

Based on a forward received.

For the New York Times and the Washington Post, Kasab is strictly a gunman.

“Mumbai Gunman Enters Plea Of Guilty”, the Post headline read a day later, and the 428 words of the report from New Delhi do not include “terrorist” — not even to qualify the “attack”.

Kasab is “one of the 10 gunmen who laid siege to India’s financial capital for three days last November”, Lashkar-e-Taiba is “outlawed, Pakistan-based group” and the attack that claimed more than 170 lives is “the deadly carnage”.

The NYT report with the headline “Suspect Stirs Mumbai Court by Confessing” has 1,050 words, but terrorist is not among them. Kasab is “suspect”, “gunman” and “attacker”.

The Wall Street Journal calls the incidents “terrorist attacks”, but those behind them were “10 suspected gunmen”. For the Los Angeles Times, the 21-year-old Pakistani is “the only suspected gunman”.

This is, of course, no different from the terminology the American media used in reporting those ghastly events on Nov 26-29 last year.

Read detail report here

The Earth Hour 2009

THIS SATURDAY 28 MARCH AT 8.30PM YOU CAN VOTE EARTH BY SWITCHING OFF YOUR LIGHTS FOR ONE HOUR – EARTH HOUR.

In what we hope will be the world’s largest mass participation event, Earth Hour will be the culmination of one billion people around the globe, in more than 1,000 cities turning off lights. This comes as perfect timing to send a message to the leaders at the upcoming Copenhagen Climate Change Conferencethat we need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions for the short and long term benefit of the planet.

In 2008, 50 million people across 35 countries turned off their lights for one hour. Lets see how much bigger we can make it this year. And with your help we can. Already hundreds of icons and landmarks around the world have signed up to turn their lights off for Earth Hour 2009 including – the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Sydney Opera House, Acropolis and Parthenon in Athens and The London Eye, among many others.

Here is what you can do:

1. Turn out your non-essential lighting during Earth Hour, Saturday March 28, between 8:30-9:30 pm local time in all buildings you can control.

2. Sign up at http://www.earthhour.org/ to show your commitment to Earth Hour and to get further details.

3. Promote and encourage your friends, family and co-workers to participate in Earth Hour.

See you in the dark!