Category: Positive Thinking


Here is something that will help in these difficult times….

The recession is viral and it has spread like wildfire. Few businesses have escaped the effects of the ongoing economic recession. The downturn has made it difficult to manage morale and take care of employee needs. Workplace motivation has plummeted, and things are only threatening to get worse. It is important to keep your team motivated during this recession. Here are six great tips for motivating your team in the face of adversity.

Be Honest

Honesty is the best policy when it comes to motivating your team. Employees will be questioning how their jobs and lives will be impacted by the recession. Don’t sugarcoat the information that you provide. Deliver clear messages and be honest about what is going on in your business.

Stop Gossip in its Tracks

Gossip is the number one killer of workplace motivation. Rumors about layoffs, cutbacks, or pay freezes can set your employees’ minds in motion. When you hear rumors floating around the workplace, squelch them as quickly as possible. If something becomes pervasive and problematic, you might have to hold a special meeting to boost team motivation.

Get Out of the Office

Motivating your team will be much easier if you all get out of the office and relax. Organize an offsite lunch or special outing as a means of energizing your team and stirring up creativity. This type of team motivation activity may come at a high price, but the positive return will be worth the investment.

Listen

Workplace motivation during a recession will also be impacted by things that are happening in your employees’ personal lives. Practice active listening skills and be sensitive to the needs and concerns of your employees.

Don’t Let Fear Cause Paralysis

Whenever there is a crisis of any kind, fear is often times a factor that gets teams off track. With the many threats that recession poses, your employees will be extremely susceptible to fear. Don’t let fear have a negative impact on team motivation. Exercise control over the things which can actually be controlled, and dismiss worries about those which cannot.

Recognize and Reward Accomplishments

Motivating your team with recognition and rewards for accomplishments is the most effective means of keeping things moving during this recession. While there may not be money in the budget for tangible rewards, a certificate of recognition, thank you note, or pat on the back goes a long way when it comes to workplace motivation.

Implementing a combination of these strategies can enhance team motivation in your workplace. The most important thing to remember during this recession is that people and relationships need to be managed with care while it is upon us. Keep the lines of communication between you and your employees open so that you can be successful in stopping the spread of fear and encouraging teamwork. While you cannot control the economy, you can exercise some influence over workplace motivation.

(from morebusiness.com)

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Last week I received an email that talks about a job interview… Thought of sharing with u..so just read on…& nJoy..

Some, rather most organizations reject his CV today because he has changed jobs frequently (10 in 14 years). My friend, the “job hopper” (referred here as Mr. JH), does not mind it. well he does not need to mind it at all. Having worked full-time with 10 employer companies in just 14 years gives Mr. JH the relaxing edge that most of the “company loyal” employees are struggling for today. Today, Mr. JH too is laid off like some other 14-15 year experienced guys  the difference being the latter have just worked in 2-3 organizations in the same number of years. Here are the excerpts of an interview with Mr. JH:


Q: Why have you changed 10 jobs in 14 years?

A: To get financially sound and stable before getting laid off the second time.

Q: So you knew you would be laid off in the year 2009?

A: Well I was laid off first in the year 2002 due to the first global economic slowdown. I had not got a full-time job before January 2003 when the economy started looking up; so I had struggled for almost a year without job and with compromises.

Q: Which number of job was that?
A: That was my third job.

Q: So from Jan 2003 to Jan 2009, in 6 years, you have changed 8 jobs to make the count as 10 jobs in 14 years?

A: I had no other option. In my first 8 years of professional life, I had worked only for 2 organizations thinking that jobs are deserved after lot of hard work and one should stay with an employer company to justify the saying employer loyalty. But I was an idiot.

Q: Why do you say so?

A: My salary in the first 8 years went up only marginally. I could not save enough and also, I had thought that I had a permanent job, so I need not worry about, what will I do if I lose my job. I could never imagine losing a job because of economic slowdown and not because of my performance. That was January 2002.

Q: Can you brief on what happened between January 2003 and 2009.

A: Well, I had learnt my lessons of being ‘company loyal and not money earning and saving loyal. But then you can save enough only when you earn enough. So I shifted my loyalty towards money making and saving – I changed 8 jobs in 6 years assuring all my interviewers about my stability.

Q: So you lied to your interviewers; you had already planned to change the job for which you were being interviewed on a particular day?

A: Yes, you can change jobs only when the market is up and companies are hiring. You tell me  can I get a job now because of the slowdown? No. So one should change jobs for higher salaries only when the market is up because that is the only time when companies hire and can afford the expected salaries.

Q: What have you gained by doing such things?

A: That’s the question I was waiting for. In Jan 2003, I had a fixed salary (without variables) of say Rs. X p.a. In January 2009, my salary was 8X. So assuming my salary was Rs.3 lakh p.a. in Jan 2003, my last drawn salary in Jan 2009 was Rs.24 lakh p.a. (without variable). I never bothered about variable as I had no intention to stay for 1 year and go through the appraisal process to wait for the company to give me a hike.

Q: So you decided on your own hike?

A: Yes, in 2003, I could see the slowdown coming again in future like it had happened in 2001-02. Though I was not sure by when the next slowdown would come, I was pretty sure I wanted a “debt-free” life before being laid off again. So I planned my hike targets on a yearly basis without waiting for the year to complete.

Q: So are you debt-free now?

A: Yes, I earned so much by virtue of job changes for money and spent so little that today I have a loan free 2 BR flat (1200 sq.. feet) plus a loan free big car without bothering about any EMIs. I am laid off too but I do not complain at all. If I have laid off companies for money, it is OK if a company lays me off because of lack of money.

Q: Who is complaining?

A: All those guys who are not getting a job to pay their EMIs off are complaining. They had made fun of me saying I am a job hopper and do not have any company loyalty. Now I ask them what they gained by their company loyalty; they too are laid off like me and pass comments to me why will you bother about us, you are already debt-free. They were still in the bracket of 12-14 lakh p.a. when they were laid off.

Q: What is your advice to professionals?

A: Like Narayan Murthy had said  love your job and not your company because you never know when your company will stop loving you. In the same lines, love yourself and your family needs more than the company’s needs. Companies can keep coming and going; family will always remain the same. Make money for yourself first and simultaneously make money for the company, not the other way around.

Q: What is your biggest pain point with companies?

A: When a company does well, its CEO will address the entire company saying, well done guys, it is YOUR company, keep up the hard work, I am with you.  But when the slowdown happens and the company does not do so well, the same CEO will say, It is MY company and to save the company, I have to take tough decisions including asking people to go.

So think about your financial stability first; when you get laid off, your kids will complain to you and not your boss.

Few weeks back I read an article from Joe Sansone where he was talking about Good & bad Boss…

read on to know if you have traits of a “Best Boss”…….

Most of us have experienced the wrath of a bad boss and fortunately many of us have also had the joy of working for a good boss.  The difference between the two is as wide as the Grand Canyon.  Throughout the years, I have identified several traits of the “best boss.” They are as follows:

1)      Exhibit integrity.

Power comes from integrity; bosses have a long leash and can get away with anything, whether it’s stiffing an employee or a third party. Bosses must always exhibit integrity.

2)      Provide a vision.

Vision is what sets good bosses apart. A good boss will share his vision to motivate his or her employees.

3)      Encourage feedback.

Obtaining feedback from your employees is an essential component of meeting their needs. Good bosses must have a mechanism for allowing their employees to express themselves. A good boss does not wait for an employee to knock on their door; rather she initiates contact with employees to discuss their needs.

4)      Actively listen to your employees needs.

Obtaining feedback is only half of the battle, the good boss actively listens to the needs of his employee.

5)      Empower employees.

The good boss empowers his employees to do the job that they were hired to due, unencumbered my micro-managing.

6)      Encourage employee’s advancement.

A good boss lets their employees know that there are opportunities for advancement within their organization. They make sure their employees know there are long term career pathways and opportunities for promotion.

7)      Give the BOD.

BOD stands for give the benefit of the doubt. You know the drill. You hear from an irate customer or an irate co-worker that one of your employees acted in some horrible way. Before you fly off at the handle and chastise your employee, give them the benefit of the doubt, ask them what happened, it will save a lot of eating crow and embarrassment later on.

8 ) Praise in public.

The employee has not been born that does not relish public praise. It is an important arrow in all bosses quiver to recognize their employees in front of their peers.

9)      Correct in private.

As important as it is to praise in public, it is equally important to never correct or chastise employees in front of their peers. The sophisticated boss does this only behind closed doors to save the employee embarrassment.

10)  Get your hands dirty.

Successful supervisors must be able to sit with their employees and assist them in their daily tasks.

11)  Have fun with your employees.

Be of good cheer.  A good boss is a happy boss, and a happy boss motivates his or her troops by being happy. This does not mean being a clown and joking around with employees, it means choosing a perspective that is positive and constructive rather than critical and destructive.

12)  Be firm, fair, and consistent.

Throughout my years of interviewing employees, I’ve asked this question 1,000 times, “who was your favorite boss and why did you like them?” The answer always comes back some version of  “my favorite  boss was always firm but fair.”

Each of us may manage utilizing a different style.  Whatever your style is, it can be accommodated by using each of these 12 components. Remember, being a  boss is a full time job and managers must work at their supervisory skills. Honing these skills is not something that is simply nice to do, honing these skills will help develop your business and your stature as a boss within your organization.

Do you know if you are D ? I ? S ? or C ?  Do you know which D Classical Pattern is yours? Which I Profile Classical Pattern?   What type of S are you?  Which Classical Pattern style is your C?  Knowing if you are D, I, S, or C is not enough.  You need to know your pattern.  Are you Pure Style D – I – S – C?  Or are you one of the 15 unique “combination” styles? Here are some basic definitions to Disc Profile from Wikipedia.  The only way to know for sure is to TEST… Don’t Guess so just READ ON.

Dominance: People who score high in the intensity of the ‘D’ styles factor are very active in dealing with problems and challenges, while low D scores are people who want to do more research before committing to a decision. High “D” people are described as demanding, forceful, egocentric, strong willed, driving, determined, ambitious, aggressive, and pioneering. Low D scores describe those who are conservative, low keyed, cooperative, calculating, undemanding, cautious, mild, agreeable, modest and peaceful.

Influence : People with High I scores influence others through talking and activity and tend to be emotional. They are described as convincing, magnetic, political, enthusiastic, persuasive, warm, demonstrative, trusting, and optimistic. Those with Low I scores influence more by data and facts, and not with feelings. They are described as reflective, factual, calculating, skeptical, logical, suspicious, matter of fact, pessimistic, and critical.

Steadiness : People with High S styles scores want a steady pace, security, and don’t like sudden change. Low S intensity scores are those who like change and variety.  High S persons are calm,  relaxed, patient, possessive, predictable, deliberate, stable, consistent, and tend to be unemotional and poker faced. People with Low S scores are described as restless, demonstrative, impatient, eager, or even impulsive.

Conscientiousness : Persons with High C styles adhere to rules, regulations, and structure. They like to do quality work and do it right the first time.  High C people are careful, cautious, exacting, neat, systematic, diplomatic, accurate, tactful. Those with Low C scores challenge the rules and want independence and are described as self-willed, stubborn, opinionated, unsystematic, arbitrary, and careless with details.

Is DOMINANCE – “High D” like you?

  • Results, Control, Get Results
  • Decisive, Direct, Accept challenges
  • Impatient, Strong willed
  • Quick, Take Action

Is INFLUENCE – “High I” like you?

  • People oriented, Optimistic
  • Recognition needed, Entertaining
  • Expressive, Outgoing
  • Enthusiastic, Energizing

DOMINANCE “High D” PATTERNS

  • Developer Pattern

  • Result Oriented Pattern

  • Inspirational Pattern

  • Creative Pattern

INFLUENCE ” High I” PATTERNS

  • Promoter Pattern

  • Persuader Pattern

  • Counselor Pattern

  • Appraiser Pattern

Is STEADINESS – “High S” like you?

  • Stable, Cooperative, Predictable

  • Deliberate, Work in background

  • Diplomatic, Consistent

  • Good listener, Sympathetic

Is CONSCIENTIOUS – “High C” like you?

  • Analytical, Concerned

  • Accurate, Orderly, Deliberate

  • Correct, Quality conscious

  • Systematic, Plan ahead

STEADINESS ” High S” PATTERNS

  • Specialist Pattern

  • Achiever Pattern

  • Agent Pattern

  • Investigator Pattern

CONSCIENTIOUS ” High C” PATTERNS

  • Objective Thinker Pattern

  • Perfectionist Pattern

  • Practitioner Pattern

Just by looking closely at this, a number of preferences can be seen within the DISC types, including:

Preference

Dominant Influential Steady Cautious
Focus on other people X X
Independent, internal X X
Energetic and busy X X
Tell rather than ask (vs. opposite) X X
Imaginative, big-picture, future-focused X X
Like stability and predictability X X
Like change (vs. stability) X X
Task-oriented (vs. people) X X
Flexible to changing world X X

The DISC can be simplified in a 2×2 grid:

People-focused Task-focused
Active, Outgoing Influential Dominant
Passive, Internal Steady Conscientious

So try to understand the DISC type. They are quite simple and thus easy to use. Then play to the person’s preferences and overall type.

With Dominant people

  • Build respect to avoid conflict
  • Focus on facts and ideas rather than the people
  • Have evidence to support your argument
  • Be quick, focused, and to the point
  • Ask what not how
  • Talk about how problems will hinder accomplishments
  • Show them how they can succeed

With Influential people

  • Be social and friendly with them, building the relationship
  • Listen to them talk about their ideas
  • Help them find ways to translate the talk into useful action
  • Don’t spend much time on the details
  • Motivate them to follow through to complete tasks
  • Recognize their accomplishments

With Steady people

  • Be genuinely interest in them as a person
  • Create a human working environment for them
  • Give them time to adjust to change
  • Clearly define goals for them and provide ongoing support
  • Recognize and appreciate their achievements
  • Avoid hurry and pressure
  • Present new ideas carefully

With Conscientious people

  • Warn them in time and generally avoid surprises
  • Be prepared. Don’t ad-lib with them if you can
  • Be logical, accurate and use clear data
  • Show how things fit into the bigger picture
  • Be specific in disagreement and focus on the facts
  • Be patient, persistent and diplomatic

Hope this is helpful…

Comments are welcome..

~Himanshu~

I keep six honest serving men
(They taught me all I knew);
Their names are What and Why and When and How and Where and Who.
-Rudyard Kipling

Enjoy ur Day
~Himanshu~

Ali baba and chaalis chor is now Ali baba tees chor…10 were laid off!

Batman and Robin is now Batman and Pedro. Batman fired Robin and hired Pedro because Pedro was willing to work twice the hours at the same rate!!

Ironman now “air-pooling” with Superman to save fuel costs?!!

Women finally marrying for love! And not money!

Husbands asking their father-in-laws for a “bailout”!

The only “deposits” being made on a Ferrari are the ones made by birds flying over them.

Q: With the current market turmoil, what’s the easiest way to make a small fortune?
A: Start off with a large one.

Q: What’s the difference between an investment banker and a large pizza?
A: A large pizza can feed a family of four.

The credit crunch is getting bad isn’t it? I mean, I let my brother borrow $10 a couple of weeks back, it turns out I’m now America ‘s third biggest lender.

Why have Dubai real estate agents stopped looking out of the window in the morning? Because otherwise they’d have nothing to do in the afternoon.

Q: What’s the difference between an American and a Zimbabwean?
A: In a few weeks, nothing.

Dow Jones is re-branded as “Down Jones”.

Goodyear is now re-branded as “Bad Year”.

Money talks. Trouble is, its knows only one word – goodbye.

Everybody gets the blues sometimes, and that’s as true at one’s job as it is outside the office. When the ennui sets in, it gets harder to retain the spring in your step as you head out to work each morning. The stress begins to show. You start coming up with reasons why your job is not right for you. But at a time when employees are being handed pink slips, it has become harder to assume that the “right job” is waiting for you just around the corner. So don’t rush to type up that resignation—give your job one more chance. Here are some tips on changing your job from “boring” to “interesting”.

Be the vehicle of change

This really is the first step to any change. List the problems you’re having, and the possible solutions to them. Think about them, and you’ll find there are many small and big changes that could improve your situation. List those changes and start working to implement them—that effort will have to come from you.

Change your perspective

It’s all in the mind, say psychologists. Recall the reasons why, during your first few months on the job, you thought it was a great one. Unless your work situation has changed drastically, some of those reasons probably still hold true. For instance, Ritu, an operator in a call centre back office, hated the extended working hours at her workplace, yet spent a good five years at it simply because her colleagues were like an extended family.

Bring about real changes

Go back to that list of the positive changes you can make. Now is the time to bring them about. Often, the reason an employee wants to quit her job is that she feels she hasn’t got what she deserves from her seniors. If you think you’ve been denied the promotion you deserve, for instance, consider talking it out with your seniors. But before marching into your boss’s office waving your list of demands, review your own work critically—from the boss’s point of view. Of course, keep in mind that talking it out is best done only when you are on a strong footing.
A good way to bring freshness to the same old job is to find new ways to do it better than before. It is this innovative outlook that has resulted in newer and improved versions of products and services in the market. Besides, at a personal level, being creatively involved will keep away the negative thoughts.

Advertise subtly

A good number of people have quit their well-paying jobs simply because they feel their hard work is appreciated. Often, this gives some people reason to blame their boss. But there’s always the possibility that the oversight was not deliberate. Too often, employees keep rather low profiles, and thus remain unnoticed. If you’re feeling overlooked, consider that it may be time to get out of the shadows. There’s no call to brag about yourself; you can handle the situation in a subtle manner. When the opportunity say , a regular feedback session—presents itself, take it to ensure that your boss is well aware of the efforts you’ve been putting in.

Tackle difficult colleagues

Often, the real reason people lose interest in their job is not the work itself, but the people at work. If there isn’t a single person in your office with whom you can get along professionally, it’s possible that the problem is yours, and not theirs. In today’s corporate scenario, the inability to work in a team is considered a weakness.

But assuming the problem is not with you, and a problem colleague really is proving detrimental to your work, consider asking your supervisor to move you to another department, where you can meet new people, although you would also have to be ready to possibly do somewhat different work. Looking for a change within your existing corporate environment maybe easier, if minor irritations are the issue.

Giving in to the impulse to quit may seem the easy way out, but life may actually be easier if the problem can be reduced or fixed without giving up the job. Quitting is for smokers!

source:timesofindia.com