Tag Archive: confidence


Absolutely stunning. The Sixth sense technology.
Guys – must watch!!

Absolutely stunning to see where technology is heading and what the future is gonna look like.

And be proud – the man behind this is an Indian!!

This is just incredible and unbelievable, yet true. Click the URL below and see the demo and find out how things are going to change in the computer world.

See the live demo of Pranav Mistry who shook the world recently on this Sixth Sense Technology.

This is simply a terrific presentation and absolutely astounding!! !!!!

At TED India, Pranav Mistry demos several tools that help the physical world interact with the world of data — including a deep look at his SixthSense device and a new, paradigm-shifting paper “laptop”.

In an onstage Q&A, Mistry says he’ll open-source the software behind Sixth Sense, to open its possibilities to all. MICROSOFT better watch out.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Pranav-Mistry-The-thrilling-potential-of-SixthSense-technology/videoshow_ted/5231080.cms

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Do you know if you are D ? I ? S ? or C ?  Do you know which D Classical Pattern is yours? Which I Profile Classical Pattern?   What type of S are you?  Which Classical Pattern style is your C?  Knowing if you are D, I, S, or C is not enough.  You need to know your pattern.  Are you Pure Style D – I – S – C?  Or are you one of the 15 unique “combination” styles? Here are some basic definitions to Disc Profile from Wikipedia.  The only way to know for sure is to TEST… Don’t Guess so just READ ON.

Dominance: People who score high in the intensity of the ‘D’ styles factor are very active in dealing with problems and challenges, while low D scores are people who want to do more research before committing to a decision. High “D” people are described as demanding, forceful, egocentric, strong willed, driving, determined, ambitious, aggressive, and pioneering. Low D scores describe those who are conservative, low keyed, cooperative, calculating, undemanding, cautious, mild, agreeable, modest and peaceful.

Influence : People with High I scores influence others through talking and activity and tend to be emotional. They are described as convincing, magnetic, political, enthusiastic, persuasive, warm, demonstrative, trusting, and optimistic. Those with Low I scores influence more by data and facts, and not with feelings. They are described as reflective, factual, calculating, skeptical, logical, suspicious, matter of fact, pessimistic, and critical.

Steadiness : People with High S styles scores want a steady pace, security, and don’t like sudden change. Low S intensity scores are those who like change and variety.  High S persons are calm,  relaxed, patient, possessive, predictable, deliberate, stable, consistent, and tend to be unemotional and poker faced. People with Low S scores are described as restless, demonstrative, impatient, eager, or even impulsive.

Conscientiousness : Persons with High C styles adhere to rules, regulations, and structure. They like to do quality work and do it right the first time.  High C people are careful, cautious, exacting, neat, systematic, diplomatic, accurate, tactful. Those with Low C scores challenge the rules and want independence and are described as self-willed, stubborn, opinionated, unsystematic, arbitrary, and careless with details.

Is DOMINANCE – “High D” like you?

  • Results, Control, Get Results
  • Decisive, Direct, Accept challenges
  • Impatient, Strong willed
  • Quick, Take Action

Is INFLUENCE – “High I” like you?

  • People oriented, Optimistic
  • Recognition needed, Entertaining
  • Expressive, Outgoing
  • Enthusiastic, Energizing

DOMINANCE “High D” PATTERNS

  • Developer Pattern

  • Result Oriented Pattern

  • Inspirational Pattern

  • Creative Pattern

INFLUENCE ” High I” PATTERNS

  • Promoter Pattern

  • Persuader Pattern

  • Counselor Pattern

  • Appraiser Pattern

Is STEADINESS – “High S” like you?

  • Stable, Cooperative, Predictable

  • Deliberate, Work in background

  • Diplomatic, Consistent

  • Good listener, Sympathetic

Is CONSCIENTIOUS – “High C” like you?

  • Analytical, Concerned

  • Accurate, Orderly, Deliberate

  • Correct, Quality conscious

  • Systematic, Plan ahead

STEADINESS ” High S” PATTERNS

  • Specialist Pattern

  • Achiever Pattern

  • Agent Pattern

  • Investigator Pattern

CONSCIENTIOUS ” High C” PATTERNS

  • Objective Thinker Pattern

  • Perfectionist Pattern

  • Practitioner Pattern

Just by looking closely at this, a number of preferences can be seen within the DISC types, including:

Preference

Dominant Influential Steady Cautious
Focus on other people X X
Independent, internal X X
Energetic and busy X X
Tell rather than ask (vs. opposite) X X
Imaginative, big-picture, future-focused X X
Like stability and predictability X X
Like change (vs. stability) X X
Task-oriented (vs. people) X X
Flexible to changing world X X

The DISC can be simplified in a 2×2 grid:

People-focused Task-focused
Active, Outgoing Influential Dominant
Passive, Internal Steady Conscientious

So try to understand the DISC type. They are quite simple and thus easy to use. Then play to the person’s preferences and overall type.

With Dominant people

  • Build respect to avoid conflict
  • Focus on facts and ideas rather than the people
  • Have evidence to support your argument
  • Be quick, focused, and to the point
  • Ask what not how
  • Talk about how problems will hinder accomplishments
  • Show them how they can succeed

With Influential people

  • Be social and friendly with them, building the relationship
  • Listen to them talk about their ideas
  • Help them find ways to translate the talk into useful action
  • Don’t spend much time on the details
  • Motivate them to follow through to complete tasks
  • Recognize their accomplishments

With Steady people

  • Be genuinely interest in them as a person
  • Create a human working environment for them
  • Give them time to adjust to change
  • Clearly define goals for them and provide ongoing support
  • Recognize and appreciate their achievements
  • Avoid hurry and pressure
  • Present new ideas carefully

With Conscientious people

  • Warn them in time and generally avoid surprises
  • Be prepared. Don’t ad-lib with them if you can
  • Be logical, accurate and use clear data
  • Show how things fit into the bigger picture
  • Be specific in disagreement and focus on the facts
  • Be patient, persistent and diplomatic

Hope this is helpful…

Comments are welcome..

~Himanshu~

If you have read PMBOK at some point of time then you know that Leadership Style are very well related to motivation. Here is something very well written that I would like to share with you.

Leadership style influence level of motivation. However, throughout a lifetime, man’s motivation is influenced by changing ambitions and/or leadership style he works under or socializes with. Command-and-control leadership drains off ambition while worker responsibility increases ambition.

Leadership Style versus Motivation
Leadership Style Motivation Type Motivation is Based on: Personality Type Efficiency

Limited supervision
Worker with decision making responsibility

Self motivated Creativity Leader of ideas or people.Independent Achiever Thrives on change

High

Team motivated

Mixed styles

Goal motivated Opportunity

Personality type and efficiency depends on leader’s skill and/or the work environment he’s created.

Reward motivated Materialism
Recognition motivated Social status

High level of supervision
Command-and-control

Peer motivated To be like others Status quoDependency Resist change

Low

Authority motivated Follows policy
Threat, fear motivated Reacts to force

Remember that: Self-motivated or visionaries will not accept authority controlled environments. They will find a way to escape if trapped. In a team-motivated environment, dependency types will become inspired and strive to be acceptable with independent thinking coworkers.

here are some finer points:

Self-motivated people are goal motivated. Once they conquer one goal, they establish another. Every goal is a learning process that requires all the elements in level one. Organizations that attract and keep this type of person stay on the leading edge of technology.

Recognition is important; it builds positive self-esteem. By itself, its benefits are short lived. Long-term benefits are achieved when the employee feels the job could not have been done without them. This means they were faced with a challenge, which means, they had the responsibility and authority to take action.

~Himanshu~

I’ll keep on updating this post….

Much has been written about the secrets of good management and few will argue that the best managers are inspired, visionary, dedicated, industrious, energetic, energizing and display integrity, leadership, common sense and courage. So where is it that managers commonly fail or falter and lose their precious foothold on the corporation’s top rungs? The following, from the career experts at bayt.com, are ten of the most basic management traps and tips to avoid them:

Weak managers set weak goals

As a manager your role is to get specific jobs completed by employees in the most optimal, efficient and innovative manner and in order to do that, you need to set clear objectives. Successful managers set SMART goals – goals that are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-based. They are able to communicate these goals clearly, simply and concisely to their employees so that none are vague or uncertain about expectations. By all means reach for the stars in your objectives but to do so without supplying employees with the training, resources, flexibility and freedom they need to accomplish their goals and a schedule of regular supervision and feedback is to set them (and yourself) up for failure.

Weak managers micro-manage – effective leaders inspire

The days of command and control organizations are long over – today’s managers recognize that in order to leverage their skills and maximize their team’s output they need to adopt a flexible approach and ‘lead’ their teams to excellence rather than closely supervise, instruct and control them. The best leaders communicate to their employees a vision and ignite in them the fire, motivation and desire to work towards making this vision a reality. Good leaders unleash their employees to innovate and achieve optimal solutions by communicating top-level goals and objectives and a suggested blueprint for success then leaving the employees to determine how to get there most optimally while ensuring they have the aptitudes, training, resources and work environment necessary to achieve superior results. While a program of regular feedback and supervision is essential, managers should ensure that their management style is not repressive, meddling or overly overbearing. The golden rule is to communicate the ‘what’ and the ‘why’ of the work that needs to be done and leave the employees to determine the ‘how’ without burdening them with strict instruction manuals or prescribed rules and patterns that are largely redundant and inconducive to speed, creativity, progress and innovation.

Weak managers are afraid of hiring/cultivating strong leaders

Strong leaders/managers have the self-confidence to hire the best people, take them to new levels and cultivate in them all the qualities needed to make them in turn effective leaders of the future. Weak leaders replicate themselves in their hiring decisions and hire mediocre players, mistakenly believing that an employee with more skills, acumen or industry knowledge than themselves will ultimately undermine them or make them look bad. The best managers are characterized by an ability to stimulate their employees to superior performance and through coaching, training, feedback as well as by example, inspire in them all the qualities needed to make effective managers. A good manager helps employees achieve their full potential and constantly raises the bar so that employees never stop learning, innovating and growing. Coaching, training, career planning and programs for ongoing growth and development of key staff are high on the priority lists of the best managers.

Weak managers belittle their employees

Bosses who favour the archaic ‘tough’ management style where employees are singled out for public reprimand and negative feedback is plentiful while recognition and positive reinforcement are scarce will fail to win the loyalty, respect and commitment of their teams over the long run. Without an inspired, fired up, self-confident employee base these managers set themselves and their teams up for failure. Effective leaders by contrast, respect their employees and give them regular feedback with intelligent constructive criticism and loudly laud special accomplishments in both public and private, while communicating any negative feedback ONLY in private and focusing such criticism strictly on the job performance, not the person’s character. Strong leaders recognize and reward a job well done. These leaders inspire their teams to perform at their best and are able to elicit from them a high degree of loyalty and a ‘hunger’ to raise the bar and continuously excel. In such organisations, employees are not afraid to challenge their boss’s ideas or upset the status quo in the interest of innovation and excellence and are encouraged to take risks to elevate the business to a new level. The autocrats and bureaucrats on the other hand sap their employees’ self-confidence, drive and energy with their overbearing management style and fail to induce in them any motivation to raise the bar or excel.

Weak managers have obsolete skills-strong leaders constantly reinvent themselves

In today’s knowledge-driven economies and highly competitive environment, skills, training and education rapidly become obsolete and effective managers know that they must constantly re-educate themselves and update their skills to maintain an edge. While over-confident managers with an inertia to further education fall by the wayside, good managers regularly take an honest inventory of their skills and abilities and upgrade their technical knowledge and soft skills wherever appropriate. They encourage their teams to do likewise with sound career planning and performance appraisal programs and an emphasis on training and self-education.

Weak managers have poor communication skills

Good communication includes cultivating and maintaining open channels of communication with the team and others in the organisation, giving constructive, intelligent feedback, eliciting ideas through brainstorming sessions or otherwise, articulating the company vision and mission in no uncertain terms, setting clear objectives and listening attentively with an open-mind to employees grievances, suggestions and any other issues. Effective leaders have an open-door policy that welcomes input, suggestions and feedback from employees and recognize that good ideas and the next best idea/process/innovation can come from anywhere. Strong leaders listen; weak leaders talk. Strong leaders pay attention to their employees and encourage them to express professional opinions and ask for more responsibility; weak leaders think they are above such open-door policies. Employees who are not listened to and are not made to feel important or respected as professionals or individuals are unlikely to innovate or express any exciting new ideas that can move a company forward.

Weak managers blame

Everybody makes mistakes and strong leaders protect their good people from taking the fall when they err. Good bosses recognize that the occasional slip-ups are inevitable and can be learning opportunities and are ready to take personal responsibility when the team makes a misstep. A good boss realizes that his most promising employees want to succeed, will grow as a result of their mistakes and are unlikely to repeat the same mistakes. They do no set their people up as a negative example for the rest of the organization nor point fingers when the going gets tough. Good bosses are personably accountable for their actions as well as the actions of their subordinates and do not allow a culture of blame to permeate the organisation.

Weak managers take full credit for their team’s accomplishments

While weak leaders usurp all the credit for a job well done by their teams, the strongest leaders will give the full credit to the team as a whole or the team member responsible for the project. Strong leaders motivate, energize and inspire by giving credit where credit is due and being generous with reward and recognition wherever appropriate. Strong leaders publicly thank their employees for a job well done and recognize that a motivated, successful, energized team will reflect directly on the boss.

Weak managers thrive on bureaucracy

Weak leaders are fond of, augment and live well with the layers and bureaucratic shackles that tie an organisation down; strong leaders remove them. Today’s effective leaders recognize that in order to compete they must operate like a small company with a high level of speed, responsiveness and flexibility. They realize that to maintain their edge in today’s marketplace their organization needs to be responsive to changing market conditions and remove the shackles, boundaries, layers, clutter and obsolete policies, procedures and routines that get in the way of the freedom and free flow of people, resources and ideas.

Weak managers are divorced from their teams

Effective managers genuinely care about their employees and take the time to get to know them and to understand their strengths, weaknesses, what makes them tick and their goals and ambitions. They also take the time to learn something about their personal life. While weak managers will maintain an outdated aloofness and a formal distance from their teams, exceptional managers are able to bring out the best in every employee and win their loyalty and respect by understanding their unique needs, motivations and abilities and showing the team that they are important and personally significant. Strong managers are team players and through their constant involvement with their teams communicate to them that they are there for them and supportive of them. Effective managers by building a supportive work environment, build a camaraderie and team spirit that enthuses and excites the team to new levels of performance.

Trying to discover innovative methods to steal the show? Here’s an answer to all your questions as to how to stand out during the meetings at your workplace. Preparation and confidence are the two key factors that you would need to distinguish yourself in a meeting. If you are well prepared and have full confidence in yourself no one can beat you to making yourself noticeable in a meeting. Here are a few tips on how you can ‘wow’ one and all in a meeting.
Prepare for the meeting well in advance. Take notes recording your thoughts on the topics and do anything else you need to do to prepare for the meeting – whether it be reading an article or having a quick conversation with any of your team members.
Always show up for the meeting on time or a few minutes early so that you are all set for the meeting when it begins. Making it to the meeting on time which shows your colleagues and seniors that you are very time conscious and that you value others time. This even helps you in creating a good impression in front of your team.

Being very focused is very important when you are in a meeting, set aside all your other activities for a while and pay attention to what is happening during the meeting. Maintaining an eye to eye contact could help you to a very great extent in avoiding distractions when you are in a meeting. Keep all your personal work aside when you are in a meeting.

Do be a very active member in the meeting. Give full participation and keep giving helpful suggestions. Be very sure that you are not to taking over the meeting. Give an equal chance to all the other members in the meeting to be a part of it. This will help in building a good rapport with them and they will get more confidence in you and your skills.
Always try and challenge ideas in a very professional manner, be sure to add a better idea whenever you reject one. Do not attack anyone during a meeting, and never ever get into an argument.
Confidence and positive attitude are very important during the meeting. Have confidence that you know what you are talking about and that you are adding valuable input to the meeting. Phrase your suggestions and challenges in a positive way, and encourage others to do the same during the meeting.
Always follow up on meetings. Make a note of the things that need to be handled after the meeting and do complete them as soon as possible. If you get new ideas after the meeting, make a suggestion for a new meeting by sending a quick email or setting up an appointment with the person planning the next meeting.

Follow these tips to tackle any difficult situation be it a job interview or your life..

1.Don’t put yourself down

2.Don’t apologize for being you

3.Be decisive don’t say may be. Say yes or no

4.Don’t say I can’t instead say, may be I can I’ll try it

5.Don’t procrastinate (postponing)

6.Think about your positive points

7.Volunteer more often

8.Dream a little

9. Set Goals.

10.Play the part

Let me know if u have some more…

~Himanshu~

1. Don’t cross your arms or legs – You have probably already heard you shouldn’t cross your arms as it might make you seem defensive or guarded. This goes for your legs too. Keep your arms and legs open.

2. Have eye contact, but don’t stare – If there are several people you are talking to, give them all some eye contact to create a better connection and see if they are listening. Keeping too much eye-contact might creep people out. Giving no eye-contact might make you seem insecure.

3. Don’t be afraid to take up some space – Taking up space by for example sitting or standing with your legs apart a bit signals self-confidence and that you are comfortable in your own skin.

4. Relax your shoulders – When you feel tense it’s easily winds up as tension in your shoulders. They might move up and forward a bit. Try to relax. Try to loosen up by shaking the shoulders a bit and move them back slightly.

5. Nod when they are talking – nod once in a while to signal that you are listening. But don’t overdo it and peck like Woody Woodpecker.

6. Don’t slouch, sit up straight – but in a relaxed way, not in a too tense manner.

7. Lean, but not too much – If you want to show that you are interested in what someone is saying, lean toward the person talking. If you want to show that you’re confident in yourself and relaxed lean back a bit. But don’t lean in too much or you might seem needy and desperate for some approval. Or lean back too much or you might seem arrogant and distant.

8. Smile and laugh – lighten up, don’t take yourself too seriously. Relax a bit, smile and laugh when someone says something funny. People will be a lot more inclined to listen to you if you seem to be a positive person. But don’t be the first to laugh at your own jokes, it makes you seem nervous and needy. Smile when you are introduced to someone but don’t keep a smile plastered on your face, you’ll seem insincere.

9. Don’t touch your face – it might make you seem nervous and can be distracting for the listeners or the people in the conversation.

10. Keep you head up – Don’t keep your eyes on the ground, it might make you seem insecure and a bit lost. Keep your head up straight and your eyes towards the horizon.

11. Slow down a bit – this goes for many things. Walking slower not only makes you seem more calm and confident, it will also make you feel less stressed. If someone addresses you, don’t snap you’re neck in their direction, turn it a bit more slowly instead.

12. Don’t fidget – try to avoid, phase out or transform fidgety movement and nervous ticks such as shaking your leg or tapping your fingers against the table rapidly. You’ll seem nervous and fidgeting can be a distracting when you try to get something across.

13. Use your hands more confidently – instead of fidgeting with your hands and scratching your face use them to communicate what you are trying to say. Use your hands to describe something or to add weight to a point you are trying to make.

14. Lower your drink – don’t hold your drink in front of your chest. In fact, don’t hold anything in front of your heart as it will make you seem guarded and distant. Lower it and hold it beside your leg instead.

15. Realise where you spine ends – many people (including me until recently) might sit or stand with a straight back in a good posture. However, they might think that the spine ends where the neck begins and therefore crane the neck forward in a Montgomery Burns-pose

16. Don’t stand too close –one of the things we learned from Seinfeld is that everybody gets weirded out by a close-talker. Let people have their personal space, don’t invade it.

17. Mirror – Often when you get along with a person, when the two of you get a good connection, you will start to mirror each other unconsciously. That means that you mirror the other person’s body language a bit. To make the connection better you can try a bit of proactive mirroring.

18. Keep a good attitude – last but not least, keep a positive, open and relaxed attitude. How you feel will come through in your body language and can make a major difference. For information on how make yourself feel better read 10 ways to change how you feel and for relaxation try A very simple way to feel relaxed for 24 hours.
Enjoy and best of Luck..

~Himanshu~